Vinyl Flooring

What is the best flooring for bathrooms?
Believe it or not, the bathroom is one of the most crucial rooms in your house. Bathrooms are an essential element of any home, whether you’re staying for the long term or thinking about selling. So it’s no wonder that when it comes to remodeling, bathrooms are always near the top of the priority list, even more so than when acquiring a property.
These significant spaces, however, require some unique finishing considerations, particularly for the flooring. The main fulcrum for these considerations is water. That’s correct, water in all its forms can cause havoc in the home, and bathroom flooring frequently absorbs the most of misdirected water.
Water will inevitably get up on your bathroom floor, walls, and ceiling, whether due to overspray, spill, leak, drip, or simply kids being kids! It’s completely unavoidable, and your bathroom must be able to withstand the influx of moisture.
For that reason alone, when planning a bathroom makeover, it’s a good idea to look into your options to discover what the finest bathroom flooring is for your project. There may be more to it than you realize!
Bathrooms require waterproof flooring.
In this piece, we will mostly discuss waterproof flooring solutions. Not sure what the difference is between waterproof and water-resistant? Water-resistant flooring may, as the name implies, resist water; but, water can and will eventually infiltrate and destroy the flooring.
When choosing flooring, water-resistant flooring is an excellent choice for a variety of rooms in the house where water is present. Examples include kitchens, basements, laundry rooms, and mudrooms. Water-resistant flooring is typically less expensive than waterproof flooring because the plywood or MDF core materials used in its manufacture are less expensive. However, the porous interior components are also responsible for swelling, warping, and peeling when exposed to moisture. Consider a wood veneer top attached to a sponge, which has been left to soak up water.
Waterproof flooring is impenetrable to water. Water may lay on it or even permeate the surface of the flooring without harming the material or, perhaps more importantly, the subflooring beneath. Waterproof flooring is defined as impenetrable to water or damp. Furthermore, the materials used to make the flooring waterproof prevent mold and mildew development because there is no moisture permeation.
Keeping this in mind, the finest materials for bathroom flooring are actually waterproof. Water-resistant flooring can easily deteriorate due to the inherent moisture and humidity found in a bathroom. And for many of them, once broken, these water-resistant boards cannot be fixed, making a complete replacement the only practical choice.
We’ll go over the greatest possibilities for waterproof flooring, specifically bathroom flooring; after all, this article should provide you with some excellent bathroom flooring ideas. But first, let’s speak about what not to do. To avoid getting off to a bad start, let’s get this out of the way first.

Do not do this in your bathroom.
Again, trying to be negative, but there are several flooring selections you should avoid during your next bathroom remodel. And they could surprise you.
Carpet provides softness underfoot. It comes in a wide range of loops, weaves, patterns, and colors. It is inexpensive. It provides charm and beauty to a variety of areas. It is out of date and has terrible bathrooms.
If you grew up in the 1970s or 1980s, you might recall carpeted restrooms. Carpeting absorbs moisture from the air or water from leaking and overspray, stores it, and converts it into mold and mildew. Mold and mildew can cause breathing problems and damage to your subfloor. We won’t even get into the germ aspect, but as most of us are aware, toilets are unpleasant places. Do you really want a bathroom floor that can’t be fully cleaned?
Hardwood and Laminates
Hardwood flooring are a terrific choice for many areas of the home. Timeless appearance. Durability. Can be refinished, providing decades of excellent flooring in almost every area of the house. Nearly, but not all. Do not put them in the restroom. To work in a bathroom, hardwoods must be precisely installed and moisture-proofed. Otherwise, water will permeate and they would eventually decay. Furthermore, they will require more regular resealing with a polyurethane type coating than if they were in another room without the moisture difficulties that a bathroom presents.
Laminate flooring and engineered woods are also not ideal choices for bathrooms. While engineered wood contains actual wood layers on top, you must also verify that it is well sealed. Often, the material beneath the wood layers is neither waterproof nor water-resistant. Laminate floors, for example, are not good with water and must be cleaned immediately to avoid swelling and warping.
Remember, your flooring professionals at The Good Guys can always assist you in deciding between water-resistant and waterproof flooring, as well as the pros and cons of bathroom flooring. So, don’t hesitate to contact us before you begin your project. Get The Good Guys engaged early and let us help with planning and product selection.
Now, shall we go to the good bathroom ideas? The ideal flooring for the most used room in the house!
Best Bathroom Flooring
As previously said, waterproof materials are crucial when selecting bathroom flooring. Typically, this implies using tougher surfaces rather than soft ones that trap water. Remember, absorption is the enemy – look at you, carpet.
Ceramic or porcelain tiles
Tile is the most common bathroom flooring option. Ceramic and porcelain tiles are excellent choices for bathrooms. Tile flooring is durable, waterproof, comes in a wide range of colors and designs, and is typically less expensive than other hard surface options. Porcelain tiles absorb far less water than any other ceramic product. Ceramic and porcelain can withstand pools and puddles of standing water, making them ideal choices for shower tiling.
Some purchasers consider tile’s features as “cons”. Because tile is a hard surface, it is frequently referred to as “hard”, “cold”, or even “sterile”. While standing for long amounts of time on tile might be uncomfortable, this is true of any hard surface, and the temperature of the floor can be controlled because porcelain and ceramic both work well with radiant flooring systems. That is fantastic in terms of sterility! Tile does not collect water or bacteria and is easy to clean, making it ideal for sterile situations.
One potential disadvantage of tile is that it can be slippery when wet, and bathrooms are almost always damp. This is not limited to porcelain or ceramic tile, however. This is true for many hard surface options; however, because porcelain and ceramic tiles are frequently baked to a smooth sheen, consumers typically perceive them as more slippery than other surfaces. For safety, choose textured tile flooring, especially in a shower.
Natural Stone Tiles
Natural stone is another excellent option for bathroom flooring. There are numerous natural stone selections available, including granite, marble, and limestone. Natural stone tile provides many of the same benefits as ceramic and porcelain tile. Stone is resistant to wear, waterproof, and comes in a range of naturally occurring colors and designs. It is available in tiles, planks, and even mosaics backed with mesh to keep the smaller tiles together.
However, there are a few factors to keep in mind when considering stone for bathroom flooring. Installing stone might be tough for do-it-yourselfers. Be mindful of this if you do this project on your own. Stone, like tile, can be slippery, however grout patterns and treatments used to “rough” the surface can help to reduce this. It may also require more frequent maintenance than other options, since some stone products necessitate the application of sealant on a regular basis to maintain the stone finish and prevent dirt and debris penetration or moisture absorption.
The most significant disadvantage for many clients considering real stone is its high cost. Natural stone provides a luxury touch to any bathroom, but it comes at a price. Stone is among the most expensive flooring alternatives available. It is a natural resource, and thus restricted, which explains the higher expense of extracting and manufacturing stone flooring.
Waterproof Vinyl Flooring
However, vinyl is one of the more affordable bathroom flooring options. The “vinyl” category includes a wide range of product configurations, which are quickly becoming some of the most popular flooring solutions on the market today. WPC & SPC Vinyl is an excellent waterproofing material for bathrooms and other moist, high-traffic areas. Vinyl can resemble wood planks, stone, and even ceramic tile.
WPC and SPC vinyl flooring are rigidcore products that combine the durability, scratch resistance, and waterproof properties of vinyl. More often available in planks but also in square tile, the core of both goods is created from wood or stone polymer compounds and covered by a wear layer, making both excellent waterproof solutions for bathroom flooring.
Waterproof vinyl is less expensive than stone and hardwood, so many people use it in other parts of the house instead of hardwood flooring. It is scratch resistant and comes in a greater range of colors and patterns than the natural items they are supposed to emulate.
Stained Concrete
Of course, if you live in an area or structure with a concrete foundation or subfloor, you can still stain and polish the concrete floors. Be warned, however, that concrete is not waterproof until properly finished and sealed. This is not a do-it-yourself project because it normally requires acid etching the concrete to prepare it for staining, as well as substantial filling, patching, and grinding. However, stained concrete is a low-cost and visually appealing flooring alternative, with a selection of color treatments that are unique to the concrete, ensuring that no one else has the same floor. However, they can be slippery when wet, like tile, and require a non-slip additive, and many prospective homebuyers will find them cold or hazardous, so keep this in mind if you are refurbishing for sale.

Vinyl Flooring